Cultists of the Kraken Lord

I took part in Midlam Miniatures’ Kickstarter for the Cultists of the Kraken Lord since they were the perfect fit for my casual collection of Lovecraftian grotesques. Are they humans wearing masks, mutants, crossbreeds, an ancient race from the deep or travellers from a plane beyond consciousness? Nobody knows for sure, and if they did, such forbidden knowledge would probably have come at the cost of their sanity.

Three humanoid figures in red robes with tentacles in place of faces

The ritual begins

I completed the first half of the cult, going for a classic combination of dark red robes with contrasting green tentacles. The figures are fun to paint, and quick to achieve effective results with.

Two figures with tentacles for faces and wearing red robes in front of a stone wall

The cultists don’t look kindly on intruders

Prowling Pack of Ghouls

The other day I completed the remaining figures from Heresy Miniatures’ Ghoul Tribe, sculpted by Paul Muller. I’d originally bought them just because they are such characterful sculpts, then started painting them as part of a long term project to collect a range of creatures fitting into Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos.

I’ve also since read Brian McNaughton’s The Throne of Bones, following a recommendation by Somet. He wasn’t kidding when he said it makes for ‘often uncomfortable’ reading, but it indeed provides many intriguing layers to the background of ghouls that most fantasy settings would rarely venture into.

Two snarling ghouls, holding a heart and a severed head and sickle respectively

Ghouls with packed lunch

Two ghouls, holding a severed leg and cutting open a cadaver respectively

Ghouls preparing dinner

One ghoul with a meat cleaver, a second ghoul on all fours, ready to jump

Ghouls feeling peckish

A pack of seven ghouls in a ruined city scape

Ghouls out hunting in the derelict part of town

Ghoulish Appetites

A while back I bought the Ghoul tribe from Heresy Miniatures, originally intended for a Ghoul Kings army in Warhammer Fantasy Battles. The figures were sculpted by Paul Muller, who also created the last edition of metal Ghouls released by Citadel which I am using for my Vampire Counts.

I am just studying S. Petersen’s Field Guide to Lovecraftian Horrors from Chaosium however and been inspired to paint some of them up for my loose collection of creatures from the Cthulhu Mythos – an idea that has probably been festering in my mind since reading Shamutantis’ post on the set.

Three twisted humanoid creatures in front of a derelict cemetery

The graveyard is home to a family of Ghouls

These three make a great family group that will lend itself to story driven games. In their background it is unclear whether Ghouls are a separate species or degenerate from humans.

As I’ll be using them in a different context, I chose a separate colour scheme from my Warhammer Ghouls – necrotic pink over anaemic white.

Back view of male, female and child Ghoul

Searching for human flesh

The characterisation on these miniatures is brilliant, and utterly horrifying. I’ve painted the baby which the hag has snatched in a contrasting warm brown to show that it has just been stolen from an unfortunate family.

Female Ghoul holding a human baby

Newest member of the tribe – or supper?

Ghoul child holding a head with an eye hanging out of its socket

Eyes are ghoulish candy

Large male Ghoul swinging a shovel

The head of the household is bringing food on the table

Visitors from Y’ha-nthlei

I played Call of Cthulhu for several years, but other than a figure representing my player character (a private investigator carrying a revolver) I never painted any creatures from the Cthulhu mythos. However, the temptation to collect a range of Lovecraftian monsters in miniature form has been gnawing away at my sanity ever since.

The first H. P. Lovecraft story I ever read was The Shadow Over Innsmouth, so when I recently stumbled upon a small coven of Deep Ones from CP Models, my fate was sealed.

Miniature models of three humanoid creatures with fish-like features

Disturbing the Deep Ones during their ritual was a bad move

I followed their original description as having greyish green wet skin with white bellies and bulging, unblinking eyes.

Bipedal creature with grey-green skin and a fish-like head

Their wet skin suggests these creatures are water dwellers

Humanoid fish-creature raising its arms

Deep Ones are servants of Dagon and Hydra

Bipedal fishy creature viewed from the side with a staring yellow eye

The Deep Ones infrequently venture on land to seal dark pacts with humans

I’m not sure yet how I’ll use these creatures in games but my appetite is whet for a menagerie of Lovecraftian monstrosities.

Back view of a Deep One with arms aloft in front of a stone monolith with engraved spiral decorations

A strange monolith is the focus of the Deep Ones’ devotion