Wrath of the Wight King

My plan for Deadcember 2017 had been to complete a Necromancer themed 1,000 point  army for Warhammer Fantasy Battle by adding two new character models for a Wight King and the Master Necromancer himself. For the former I had recently picked up the excellent Wight Lord by Heresy Miniatures which was a perfect fit for the style of the army. Due to a painting slump I only just managed to complete this now however.

Skeletal figure in armour holding sword and decapitated heads in front of ranks for skeleton warriors

Commanding the dead

There isn’t any unnecessary detail on the sculpt and I like its slim silhouette which is well suited to fit into the entirely infantry based army of skeletons, zombies and haggard ghouls. I might add some blood splatter onto the blade later courtesy of the decapitated heads, but right now I am not very happy with my painting so I didn’t want to risk spoiling the miniature in case it went wrong. In general, I am using very few splashes of colour across the army anyway, with red mostly being reserved for the vampires.

As the Master Necromancer I am planning to use the 4th Edition sculpt of Heinrich Kemmler, to date one of my favourite miniatures of all time.

Curse of the Mummy Collector

Ever since I painted the first two mummies for my Warhammer 3rd Edition Undead army I haven’t been able to rest easy. Knowing there were two more ancient sculpts out there to complete the set, I undertook several gruelling expeditions until they were finally discovered and bound to my necromantic forces.

Two ancient mummies

They are coming to get you

Side view of two walking mummies

The shambling dead

Now four strong, these powerful undead can bring doom to entire regiments of enemies. If they weren’t so slow.

Four mummies advancing side by side

The resurrected

Prowling Pack of Ghouls

The other day I completed the remaining figures from Heresy Miniatures’ Ghoul Tribe, sculpted by Paul Muller. I’d originally bought them just because they are such characterful sculpts, then started painting them as part of a long term project to collect a range of creatures fitting into Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos.

I’ve also since read Brian McNaughton’s The Throne of Bones, following a recommendation by Somet. He wasn’t kidding when he said it makes for ‘often uncomfortable’ reading, but it indeed provides many intriguing layers to the background of ghouls that most fantasy settings would rarely venture into.

Two snarling ghouls, holding a heart and a severed head and sickle respectively

Ghouls with packed lunch

Two ghouls, holding a severed leg and cutting open a cadaver respectively

Ghouls preparing dinner

One ghoul with a meat cleaver, a second ghoul on all fours, ready to jump

Ghouls feeling peckish

A pack of seven ghouls in a ruined city scape

Ghouls out hunting in the derelict part of town

Lair of the Necromancer

I completed the small coven of necromancer and zombies from the Fantasy and History Kickstarter for Frostgrave (or whichever other fantasy skirmish game the future holds for me). Thanks to Bad Squiddo Games for promoting this campaign which otherwise would have passed by me.

Back view of the necromancer and a zombie with sword

The puppet master pulls his strings

My favourite figure of the lot is this half skeletal zombie with a raven on his shoulder. It reminds me of a classic from Citadel that I painted for my Oldhammer Undead. The sculpting quality on this model is very high – I really like the position of the fingers on the left hand and the leaning posture with the large sword dragging behind, as if the wielder still vaguely remembers its use.

Zombie with sword and a raven on his shoulder

A raven’s feast

On the necromancer there were some elements I couldn’t clearly identify, like the top of the staff. Overall he is pleasantly creepy looking though. I believe he is not meant to be a common human, as his hands are three long laws.

Necromancer with clawlike hands holding a staff with a decapitated head

The dark sorcerer in his hideout

With this villain and his henchmen finished I’ll probably look into getting a band of adventurers together next to fight through the ruins of a soon to be expanded town.

A necromancer flanked by three zombies

Bringing death to the streets

The Newly Deceased

I supported a small Kickstarter project by a German rookie sculptor a few months ago and pledged for the Undead faction (surprise!) consisting of three zombies, a necromancer, a vampire and a headless horseman. This was the first release under the Fantasy and History label, which I hope will make it off the ground as a new manufacturer and find some distribution.

Over the weekend I started painting the models and finished the first two zombies, the simplest of the sculpts.

Two zombies in front of a medieval building ruin

The dead stalk their former neighbourhood

The figures are in a non-heroic scale and nicely proportioned. There are some characterful touches like the half exposed skull and the skeletal lower leg and the poses evoke a suitably shambling walk. I intend to use them for Frostgrave, which I am casually gathering bits and pieces for without having played the game so far.

Figure of a zombie in an upright walking pose

In the background my first building from 4Ground’s Mordanburg range, which I am totally sold on and will use to build up a small townscape suitable for Frostgrave, Mordheim or as a backdrop for fantasy battles. For the same purpose I bought the 4×4 Cobblestone Battlefield by UrbanMatZ, an equally good purchase.

Figure of a zombie in a low lurching gait

Ghoulish Appetites

A while back I bought the Ghoul tribe from Heresy Miniatures, originally intended for a Ghoul Kings army in Warhammer Fantasy Battles. The figures were sculpted by Paul Muller, who also created the last edition of metal Ghouls released by Citadel which I am using for my Vampire Counts.

I am just studying S. Petersen’s Field Guide to Lovecraftian Horrors from Chaosium however and been inspired to paint some of them up for my loose collection of creatures from the Cthulhu Mythos – an idea that has probably been festering in my mind since reading Shamutantis’ post on the set.

Three twisted humanoid creatures in front of a derelict cemetery

The graveyard is home to a family of Ghouls

These three make a great family group that will lend itself to story driven games. In their background it is unclear whether Ghouls are a separate species or degenerate from humans.

As I’ll be using them in a different context, I chose a separate colour scheme from my Warhammer Ghouls – necrotic pink over anaemic white.

Back view of male, female and child Ghoul

Searching for human flesh

The characterisation on these miniatures is brilliant, and utterly horrifying. I’ve painted the baby which the hag has snatched in a contrasting warm brown to show that it has just been stolen from an unfortunate family.

Female Ghoul holding a human baby

Newest member of the tribe – or supper?

Ghoul child holding a head with an eye hanging out of its socket

Eyes are ghoulish candy

Large male Ghoul swinging a shovel

The head of the household is bringing food on the table