Every Warboss Starts Out Small

The Orcs were a major force in Warhammer 40k when I started out, with several large volumes of background and army lists complementing the Rogue Trader rule set. I had a force consisting of Goffs, Bad Moons and Freebooterz cobbled together, which got lost on one too many warp jumps.

For the last couple of years I gradually built up a new collection mostly through impulse buys, and after having re-read ‘Ere We Go, Waaargh the Orks and Freebooterz, I recently decided on raising a small force of Blood Axes.

Space Ork with heavy grey coat and power axe, flanked by two Gretchin with shotguns

The Warboss and his entourage, poised for greater things

I’ll loosely base the force on the army list in ‘Ere We Go, with some licence regarding weapon choices and unit sizes. To start me off, I painted the Blood Axes Warboss, and finished some more Gretchin which had languished in painting limbo for over a decade. There are a few more of them to come, and I might form them up into a mob of Gretchin Bandits together with a unit of 13 I already have.

Back view of Ork with crossed golden axes on white backplate

The Warboss stems from the Golden Axe household

Back view of two Gretchin

The Gretchin have equipped themselves with looted armour

14 thoughts on “Every Warboss Starts Out Small

    • He was top of the list of Space Orks I wanted for my original army, so glad I finally got him, and finished at that.

  1. The older Ork models are so characterful. I think it’s all in the faces, the sculptors managed to capture a sense of fun and coarse, violent humour in their expressions.

    • Agreed, that is what attracted me to the orcs and goblins (and their space equivalents) as my first wargaming armies.

  2. …and speaking of old-school classic orcs! Lovely work here on that early Blood Axe, and extra kudos for the very appropriate Clan name – fitting the era perfectly! The grots look great as well, and you haven’t skimped on their details either. All the little stuff like the highlights on the hair and the banding on the horns make that extra bit of (often unconscious) difference!

    • Glad you are enjoying them. The level of detail on these sculpts is just right to give them their individuality, so it is enjoyable to pick all those elements out. The household name just fell into place – browsing through suitable spot colours to use, it suddenly all snapped together.

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