Snake Charming

I thought my progress might falter when it came to the larger beasts and characters for Conan, but I seem to have settled into my approach, so the first two were done over a few short painting stints.

The giant snake was the first of the monsters Monolith showed off, and it really made me take notice. I like monsters but I have very few actually painted.

A large curled up snake with orange spiky scales rearing with exposed fangs

The giant snake is ready to strike

Painting the scales on the giant snake by normal means with individual highlighting would take me ages. I’m sure the results would be brilliant and the sculpt deserves it, but I’m still happy with what I got using a handful of colours and a coat of Army Painter Quickshade.

A loin clothes shaman with a spear leading a giant snake onwards

The shaman controls the monster through dark magic

The shaman Zogar Sag was painted using the same colour scheme as his tribesmen. Given his very different physique and theatrical pose he should still stand out from the crowd.

A shaman holding a spear and a human heart in front of a giant snake

Bloody sacrifice fuels the shaman’s power

The villains are waiting, ready to sacrifice Yselda to their dark god. It is time for the heroes to enter the scene!

17 thoughts on “Snake Charming

  1. Great work here! The reddish scheme for the snake (and it’s spiky spine-scales) make it look very draconic. I’m very keen to open up my own pledge after seeing your recent updates!

    • There is definitely some dragon in there, I think a scaled up more normal snake body wouldn’t have looked right in relation to the humanoid figures. I hope you can get started on your set soon, looking forward to picking up some good ideas!

  2. A beautiful play with colours on the back of the snake. really fits the sculpt. I also like the skeletal tail of the beast. the shaman looks suitably old and gnarly, with your paintjob drawing the attention to his face, the skull and the heart. Really cool stuff!

    • Thanks, I stayed true to the original artwork for the colours, and the stripes were easy to do even with the larger spikes and scales along the back. The shaman pretty much painted itself – the definition on it is so good that the Quickshade did its job without any help. I think it worked better than on the other Picts in fact, who have larger smooth areas of muscle. The gnarlier, the better for this method.

    • All credit goes to the original artist here, I can merely claim to recognise a good paint scheme when I see it! The colours and sculpt capture the exotic flair of Conan, which sets it apart from most of the other miniatures ranges in my collection.

    • Cheers, very happy with how snake-like it turned out. I did consider leaving it glossy with just the Quickshade on, but with its size that effect was a bit too much.

  3. Very nice work. I was wondering, how did you do the skin on the shaman? I’ve painted mostly white guys for my Space Wolves and after binge watching “Marco Polo” on Netflix, I thought I might try some skin more like your shaman for some chaos horsemen I recently put together.

    • Thank you. The shaman couldn’t have been easier, it is literally just Citadel Cadian Fleshtone with brushed on Army Painter Soft Tone Quickshade. I did notice a slight cracking effect of the base paint under the layer of varnish, but it is really just visible under close inspection – and could even be desired for horsemen of Chaos!

    • Thanks! I am brushing the quick shade on. Dipping and shaking sounds messy, and I am painting in the living room. It’s not possible to work this stuff for very long before it starts setting, then it takes a day to dry.

    • Thank you. I just added a bit of Agrax Earthshade into the eye sockets and mouth and painted the tongue red and teeth bone (which isn’t visible here) before letting the Quickshade do its work. The sculpt is really nice and crisp, so all the lines in the face just appeared as if by dark magic.

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